Using the SameAs Schema.org Markup Tag in SEO

The sameAs Schema Tag and how to use it  

SEOs can use the sameAs schema markup to help a search engine understand what a page is about. You can do this by pointing out a page with similar subject matter that you are confident the search engine DOES understand.  

The sameAs tag unambiguously indicates an item’s identity through connecting it to such sources as its corresponding Wikipedia pages, Wiki Entry, or official website. It essentially takes a ‘thing’ and gives it context by linking it to a trusted URL value formant. This then links the content to the information that exists on this authoritative page. In this way, we can create schema around a keyword and shift it into becoming an entity through pre-existing and authoritative data collections.  

By defining your own entities in this way, search engines can see the underlying structured data when crawling your page and have a better-defined understanding of what these entities entail. Google is becoming increasingly human every day, and the SameAs schema tag is a perfect example of this.

Does the sameAs schema affect rankings? 

The semantic markup of a website consists of adding structured data which enables a website to better describe its content. However, incorrectly implemented schema can result in a loss of rankings.

When done right, however, tagging your data with sameAs contributes to a variety of SEO fundamentals including rich snippets and local SEO panels. As Google knows what you are talking about, it feels much more confident in bringing you to the top of the ranking. It is not enough anymore to use keywords in isolation, and supplying the context in which your content exists is helpful in delivering a great user experience.  

Providing Google with structured data – and checking it with the Google Structured Data Testing Tool – means search engines can access your content’s true meaning. Webmasters can communicate most effectively with search engines in this fashion to encourage visibility. Although I have not seen this confirmed by Googlers to directly affect a page ranking, schema markup using the sameAs tag has the potential to indirectly affect rankings, with increased visibility via rich snippets.

In May 2020, Inlinks carried out a controlled test in which many SEOs added the sameAs schema to their site and made little to no other changes to their Seo strategy. It was found that, over the course of a month, twice as many sites gained rankings than lost rankings. Although Google does not say for sure that sameAs schema has a direct change to the core algorithms, it is extremely helpful to tell explain what you’re talking about using authoritative URLs.  

Is there an easy way to add the sameAs tag to my website?  

Yes! When you inject the Inlinks JavaScript code onto your site, Inlinks automatically generates a schema markup for the topics you have targeted to your pillar pages. This is enabling ABOUT and MENTIONS schema which is aided by the sameAs tag. Not only this, but it also creates FAQ schema  

Inlinks can do this so well as it has built its own knowledge graph, which connects a mass amount of ‘about’ entities through the sameAs tag.  

Here is an example, I have highlighted the sameAs tag in red:  

<script type="application/ld+json"> {
"@context": "https://schema.org",
"@type": "WebPage",
"@id": "https://dixonjones.com/seo/seo-traps-in-wordpress/#ContentSchema"
"headline": "SEO Traps & WordPress",
"url": "https://dixonjones.com/seo/seo-traps-in-wordpress/",
"about": [
   {"@type": "Thing", "name": "Search_engine_optimization", "sameAs": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_engine_optimization"},
   {"@type": "Thing", "name": "WordPress", "sameAs": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WordPress"},
   {"@type": "Thing", "name": "trap", "sameAs": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trapping"}
],
"mentions": [
   {"@type": "Thing", "name": "Search Engine", "sameAs": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_engine"},
   {"@type": "Thing", "name": "website", "sameAs": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Website"},
   {"@type": "Thing", "name": "blog", "sameAs": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog"},
   {"@type": "Thing", "name": "Digital Marketing", "sameAs": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_marketing"},
   {"@type": "Organization", "name": "Google", "sameAs": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google"},
   {"@type": "Thing", "name": "print", "sameAs": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Publishing"},
   {"@type": "Thing", "name": "Marketing", "sameAs": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marketing"}
]
} </script>

Inlinks has generated its schema markup to include a primary and a secondary about data. This spells out the relevant topics on this page. When injected onto your page this JavaScript uses its own knowledge graph to create these associations all within 4-5 clicks. 

Try inlinks for FREE to see how it can help improve your schema markup strategy.

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